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Next APPG Meeting -Improving Standards in Diabetes Care: Putting Learning into Practice

This year the APPG for Diabetes launched an investigation under the theme: Diabetes Care: improving standards and reducing variation, which is ongoing.

Our next meeting will take place on Wednesday, 7 September 2016 from 4-5pm with the theme: Improving standards in diabetes care: putting learning into practice.

This will be the fourth and final meeting of this investigation. The focus of this meeting will be on how existing knowledge and learning has been applied to improve care and will present case studies of how Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) have reduced the variation in care in practice.

CCGs are responsible for implementing the commissioning roles as set out in the Health and Social Care Act 2012. This includes working with providers and stakeholders to develop services that support the needs of their patient population. People with diabetes rely on a range of services due to the complexity of the condition and how it is managed. The Group will hear from speakers who have policy and practical expertise in driving improvements in care and improving treatment outcomes.

If you would like to attend, please RSVP by emailing diabetes-appg@outlook.com. Due to limits on room capacity, please note that admittance will be on a first come, first served and one organisation, one person basis.

Minutes from the last meeting:

The APPG’s last meeting took place on 20 July 2016 under the theme: The role of healthcare professionals in diabetes care. Minutes from the meeting can be found here.

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Diabetes in Parliament: 22nd – 29th July

House of Commons Questions

Diabetes: Depressive Illnesses – DH – Jim Shannon

Mon, 25 July 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Jim Shannon (Strangford) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what research his Department has undertaken or assessed on links between depression and diabetes.

Answered by:
Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 25 July 2016

NHS England is undertaking work aimed at supporting people with diabetes who need psychological support: for example, psychological support for children with diabetes is being incentivised through the paediatric diabetes best practice tariff.

More generally, work has recently been undertaken on treating common mental health disorders for people with long term physical conditions, including diabetes. Based on the findings from this and other published evidence, Implementing the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health outlines NHS England’s ambition that two thirds of the expansion of psychological therapies services for common mental health problems, such as depression, will be integrated within physical health pathways, including diabetes.


Diabetes: Medical Equipment – DH – Jim Shannon

Mon, 25 July 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Jim Shannon (Strangford) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans his Department has to make personal devices for instant monitoring of insulin levels available to people with diabetes on the NHS.

Answered by:
Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 25 July 2016

We are not aware of any clinical utility associated with the instant monitoring of insulin levels. However, continuous glucose monitoring devices can measure glucose levels 24 hours a day and it is for National Health Service commissioners to decide whether to make these available to their local populations.

In August 2015, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published guidelines which recommend that such devices should not be made routinely available to people with Type 1 diabetes unless they are willing to commit to using them at least 70% of the time and to calibrate them as needed (as well as meeting certain other criteria).

NICE has found that, for some people, continuous glucose monitoring can have clinical benefit but generally it is not more effective than current methods of self-monitoring. Continue Reading

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A view of how healthcare professionals work to improve diabetes care

The APPG for Diabetes investigation into diabetes care, with the aim of improving standards and reducing variation held its third meeting on 20th July. The Group heard from a range of healthcare professionals (HCP) involved in the care of people with diabetes. HCPs face a number of pressures when caring for those with a complex condition such as diabetes: limited time, varying knowledge and different processes depending on the environment they work in.

Liz McInnes 2

Liz McInnes MP co-charing the meeting with the healthcare professioanl speakers

The HCPs speaking included a consultant in diabetes and endocrinology, a diabetes specialist nurse, a pharmacist, a dietician and a podiatrist with each focusing on challenges they face and potential solutions to these challenges.

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Diabetes in Parliament: 15th – 22nd July

House of Commons Questions

Diabetes: Health Education – DH – Mr Jamie Reed

Mon, 18 July 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Mr Jamie Reed (Copeland) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will provide support to employers to encourage people diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes to attend a diabetes education course soon after they are diagnosed.

Answered by:
Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 18 July 2016

Promoting the best possible care for all people with diabetes is a key priority for this Government.

Patient education will play a crucial part in empowering all people with diabetes to manage their condition more effectively and help avoid complications in the future. We know there is much further to go in the proportion of people with diabetes attending structured education programmes. The Department, NHS England and Diabetes UK are currently looking at a number of ways to improve take up.


Diabetes: Medical Equipment – DH – Mr Jamie Reed

Mon, 18 July 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

  • Asked by Mr Jamie Reed (Copeland) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate his Department has made of the annual cost to people with Type 1 diabetes who self-fund a continuous glucose monitor.
  • Asked by Mr Jamie Reed (Copeland) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the potential benefit to the UK economy of NHS investment in continuous glucose monitors for adults and children with Type 1 Diabetes.

Answered by:
Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 18 July 2016

No estimate has been made of the annual cost to people with Type 1 diabetes who self-fund a continuous glucose monitor.

In August 2015, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence provided updated guidelines for both Type 1 diabetes and for children and young people with diabetes. In both, the cost effectiveness, as well as the clinical effectiveness, of continuous glucose monitoring was assessed. Both sets of guidelines outline specific clinical situations where the clinical and cost effectiveness justify consideration of the use of the technology. Continue Reading

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Diabetes in Parliament: 27 June – 8 July

House of Commons

House of Commons Questions

Vaz, K – DH – Diabetes and pharmacies

Tue, 5 July 2016 | House of Commons – Oral Question

Keith Vaz (Leicester East) (Lab)

Mr Speaker, let us note another milestone this year: your election yesterday as a freeman of the City of London. We look forward to you bringing your own flock of sheep to Westminster in future.

The Secretary of State will know that we are facing a diabetes crisis, and by 2025, 5 million people will have been diagnosed with diabetes. There are 32,000 pharmacies in the United Kingdom, with 13,000 community-based schemes. Given that 99% of the population live near a pharmacy, does the Secretary of State agree that more diabetes work should be given to pharmacies, to try to ease the burden and pressure on general practitioners?

Mr Hunt

There is a lot of potential in what the right hon. Gentleman says. The financial pressures on the NHS and general practice mean that this is the right moment to rethink the role of pharmacies, and consider whether we can be better at tapping into the incredible skills that pharmacists have as trained clinicians, which I do not think we make the most of. He is right to say that diabetes and childhood obesity is a big priority for the Government, and I hope we will be able to inform the House more about that soon.


Obesity: Surgery – DH – Jim Shannon

Wed, 6 July 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Jim Shannon (Strangford) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions he has had with clinical bodies on the potential merits of weight-loss surgery in preventing diabetes.

Answered by:
Jane Ellison
Answered on: 06 July 2016

There have been no such discussions.


Diabetes – DH – Keith Vaz

Fri, 1 July 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Keith Vaz (Leicester East) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what awareness-raising activities his Department has undertaken in support of Diabetes Awareness Week 2016.

Answered by:
Jane Ellison
Answered on: 01 July 2016

Public Health England’s (PHE) One You and Change4Life campaigns encourage people and families to make lifestyle changes to improve their health and reduce the risk of conditions such as diabetes on an ongoing basis.

PHE had scheduled Facebook posts raising awareness of Diabetes Awareness Week 2016. Continue Reading

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An overview of treatments for Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes can often initially be managed through lifestyle changes alone, most people with Type 2 diabetes will need to progress to medication to help manage their blood glucose levels. In the past, when people with Type 2 diabetes were no longer able to manage the condition through lifestyle alone, insulin was then used to help control blood glucose levels. Since 1930s other treatments to help manage Type 2 diabetes have been developed.

These new non-insulin treatments have different modes of action. They are able to

  • Reduce carbohydrate digestion
  • Increase insulin secretion
  • Enhance insulin sensitivity
  • Increase the amount of glucose passed out in urine

 

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