Article

Weekly diabetes parliamentary round-up

Our weekly diabetes parliamentary round-up is below. To see the full round-up please click for more at the bottom of the post.

Health Committee – University of Oxford, University of Liverpool & PHE, Faculty of Public Health, RCPCH, ADPH – Childhood Obesity Strategy

Tue, 20 October 2015 | DeHavilland Report – Parliamentary Committee

Members present: Dr Sarah Wollaston (Chair); Dr James Davies; Maggie Troup; Dr Philippa Whitford.

Witnesses: Professor Susan Jebb OBE, University of Oxford, Dr Peter Scarborough, University of Oxford, Dr Alison Tedstone, Director of Diet and Obesity, Public Health England, Dr Emma Boyland, Institute of Psychology, University of Liverpool.

Witnesses: Professor Simon Capewell, Vice President, Faculty of Public Health, Dr Colin Michie, Chair of Nutrition Committee, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, and Dr Jeanelle de Gruchy, Vice-President, Association of Directors of Public Health, gave evidence.

Watch the meeting

Health Committee – Public Health England & Jamie Oliver – Childhood obesity strategy

Mon, 19 October 2015 | DeHavilland Report – Parliamentary Committee
SUMMARY

Overview

During a meeting of the Health Committee on the childhood obesity strategy, the Committee heard from:

  • Duncan Selbie, Chief Executive, Public Health England
  • Jamie Oliver, MBE

Watch the meeting here


House of Commons Questions

Mr Jim Cunningham – Prisoners: Diabetes

Wed, 21 October 2015 | House of Commons – Written Answer

CONTENTS (Grouped questions)

Asked by Mr Jim Cunningham (Coventry South) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes within the prison population; and if he will make a statement.

Asked by Mr Jim Cunningham (Coventry South) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to manage the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in the prison population; and if he will make a statement.

Answered by:

Ben Gummer Answered on: 21 October 2015

The most recent assessment of Type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent) prevalence within prisons in England was published by Public Health England (PHE) in July 2014. This information is shown in the following table:

Type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent) prevalence within prisons in England, July 2014: percentage of male and female prisoners, age 16 years and over with confirmed type 2 diabetes

Age range (years)            16-24     25-34     35-44     45-64     65+

Male      0              0.1          0.3          1.9          4.2

Female                 0              0.1          0.2          0.7 (45-54) 2.1 (55-64)    4.2

Source: Public Health England – Health and Justice Health Needs Assessment

Template: Adult Prisons, July 2014; prevalence of physical health problems

The Department estimates that up to 80% of Type 2 diabetes cases are largely preventable through behaviour interventions, including healthy dieting and increased physical activity. With NHS England and PHE, the Department is committed to ensuring that prisoners with Type 2 diabetes or at risk of developing this condition receive an equivalent level of health care to people in the community with this condition.

Patients over 12 years old with existing diabetes, including prisoners, should receive all National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommended diabetes monitoring. These include blood pressure, cholesterol, body mass index and foot care surveillance. There is good evidence that achieving NICE recommended diabetes treatment targets reduces complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, blindness, amputation and premature death.

________________________________________

Jim Shannon – Diabetes

Tue, 20 October 2015 | House of Commons – Written Answer

CONTENTS

Asked by Jim Shannon (Strangford) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what support is available for people with diabetes to ensure that they can continue to live independently.

Answered by:

Jane Ellison Answered on: 20 October 2015

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence quality standard for diabetes sets out that people with diabetes should receive a structured educational programme as this is key to ensuring that they are able to manage their condition as successfully as possible.

While there is still much room for improvement, the proportion of people with diabetes being offered structured education is rising. 16% of people newly diagnosed with diabetes were offered structured education in 2012/13 compared to just over 8% of those diagnosed in 2009. In the same period the number of people newly diagnosed with diabetes offered or attending structured education rose from 11% to over 18%.

Improving the outcomes of people with and at risk of diabetes is of great concern to this Government and we will put forward our plans in due course.

________________________________________

Mr Laurence Robertson – Diabetes: Orthopaedics

Tue, 20 October 2015 | House of Commons – Written Answer

CONTENTS

Asked by Mr Laurence Robertson (Tewkesbury) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the number of amputations caused by diabetes (a) nationally and (b) in Gloucestershire in the last 12 months; and if he will make a statement.

Answered by:

Jane Ellison Answered on: 20 October 2015

The attached table gives the number of finished consultant episodes with a primary diagnosis of diabetes and a primary or secondary procedure of amputation for (a) England and (b) Gloucestershire based Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), for the years 2013-14 and 2014-15 provisional.

NHS Gloucestershire CCG and its provider partners have established a Diabetes Footcare Group in order to further analyse local amputation rates and ensure that the appropriate service improvements are made to reduce unnecessary complications of diabetes-related vascular disease such as lower limb amputations.

FCEs diabetes and amputations 2013-15(Excel SpreadSheet, 22.08 KB)

________________________________________

Keith Vaz – Diabetes

Mon, 19 October 2015 | House of Commons – Written Answer

CONTENTS

Asked by Keith Vaz (Leicester East) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the number of people in each county who have diabetes.

Asked by Keith Vaz (Leicester East) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the number of people (a) diagnosed and (b) currently undiagnosed with diabetes in (i) England, (ii) Wales, (iii) Scotland and (iv) Northern Ireland.

Answered by:

Jane Ellison Answered on: 19 October 2015

The information on estimates of people in each county who have diabetes is not available in the format requested. The table below shows the estimated number of people with diabetes for upper tier district authorities. The estimates ranges from 5.4% in the City of London, to 10.7% in Brent.

Estimated ranges of people with diabetes for upper tier district authorities for 2014

2014                                                       Number Prevalence

England                                         3,279,925    7.5%

Buckinghamshire CC                       28,986   7.1%

Cambridgeshire CC                          35,215   6.7%

Cumbria CC                                         33,879   8.0%

Derbyshire CC                                   48,864   7.6%

Devon CC                                            52,629   8.1%

Dorset CC                                            30,060   8.7%

East Sussex CC                                  37,859   8.6%

Essex CC                                              87,202   7.2%

Gloucestershire CC                         36,877   7.4%

Hampshire CC                                    77,073   7.1%

Hertfordshire CC                              62,079   6.8%

Kent CC                                                90,195   7.5%

Lancashire CC                                    76,349   7.8%

Leicestershire CC                             40,535   7.4%

Lincolnshire CC                                 48,338   8.0%

Norfolk CC                                          59,406   7.9%

Northamptonshire CC                    41,475   7.1%

North Yorkshire CC                          39,207   7.7%

Nottinghamshire CC                       49,494   7.5%

Oxfordshire CC                                 35,376   6.6%

Somerset CC                                      36,052   8.0%

Staffordshire CC                               52,956   7.6%

Suffolk CC                                           47,835   7.7%

Surrey CC                                            62,828   6.8%

Warwickshire CC                              34,255   7.5%

West Sussex CC                                52,761   7.8%

Worcestershire CC                          36,287   7.8%

City of London LB                             693         5.4%

Barking and Dagenham LB            9,942     7.5%

Barnet LB                                             23,493   8.2%

Bexley LB                                             13,716   7.3%

Brent LB                                               21,497   10.7%

Bromley LB                                         18,676   7.2%

Camden LB                                         12,758   6.1%

Croydon LB                                         23,737   8.5%

Ealing LB                                               22,765   8.8%

Enfield LB                                            19,233   8.2%

Greenwich LB                                    13,330   7.3%

Hackney LB                                         13,882   8.1%

Hammersmith and Fulham LB                     9,120     6.5%

Haringey LB                                                        14,316   7.7%

Harrow LB                                                           18,567   9.6%

Havering LB                                                        14,746   7.5%

Hillingdon LB                                                      16,509   7.6%

Hounslow LB                                                      16,311   8.3%

Islington LB                                                         10,389   6.3%

Kensington and Chelsea LB                          11,515   7.6%

Kingston upon Thames LB                            9,119     6.2%

Lambeth LB                                                        16,069   6.6%

Lewisham LB                                                      15,799   7.1%

Merton LB                                                           11,751   6.6%

Newham LB                                                        17,950   10.1%

Redbridge LB                                                     19,326   8.8%

Richmond upon Thames LB                         10,345   6.3%

Southwark LB                                                    16,709   6.5%

Sutton LB                                                             11,149   6.9%

Tower Hamlets LB                                            14,360   7.2%

Waltham Forest LB                                          14,919   8.5%

Wandsworth LB                                                14,232   5.8%

Westminster LB                                                15,354   6.4%

Bolton MD                                                          17,905   8.4%

Bury MD                                                              11,054   7.5%

Manchester MD                                               27,051   6.5%

Oldham MD                                                        14,368   8.4%

Rochdale MD                                                     13,608   8.4%

Salford MD                                                         13,212   6.9%

Stockport MD                                                    17,225   7.4%

Tameside MD                                                    14,001   7.9%

Trafford MD                                                       12,732   7.2%

Wigan MD                                                           18,785   7.4%

Knowsley MD                                                    9,246     7.7%

Liverpool MD                                                     26,281   7.1%

St Helens MD                                                     11,119   7.6%

Sefton MD                                                          17,851   8.0%

Wirral MD                                                            19,508   7.9%

Barnsley MD                                                      14,456   7.6%

Doncaster MD                                                   18,782   7.9%

Rotherham MD                                                                 16,434   7.8%

Sheffield MD                                                     33,060   7.0%

Gateshead MD                                                 12,158   7.6%

Newcastle upon Tyne MD                            16,034   6.6%

North Tyneside MD                                        12,242   7.3%

South Tyneside MD                                        9,982     7.8%

Sunderland MD                                                17,552   7.5%

Birmingham MD                                               72,576   8.8%

Coventry MD                                                     20,609   7.9%

Dudley MD                                                         20,361   8.0%

Sandwell MD                                                     22,244   9.5%

Solihull MD                                                         13,109   7.7%

Walsall MD                                                          18,340   9.0%

Wolverhampton MD                                      19,090   9.8%

Bradford MD                                                      35,136   8.5%

Calderdale MD                                                 12,987   7.7%

Kirklees MD                                                        27,064   8.1%

Leeds MD                                                            45,596   6.5%

Wakefield MD                                                   20,763   7.6%

Hartlepool UA                                                   5,690     7.6%

Middlesbrough UA                                          8,791     7.7%

Redcar and Cleveland UA                             9,121     8.1%

Stockton-on-Tees UA                                    11,330   7.1%

Darlington UA                                                    6,314     7.6%

County Durham UA                                         32,455   7.6%

Northumberland UA                                      21,048   8.0%

Cheshire East UA                                             22,235   7.3%

Halton UA                                                           7,168     7.5%

Warrington UA                                                 11,560   7.0%

Cheshire West and Chester UA                 19,617   7.2%

Blackburn with Darwen UA                          9,525     8.9%

Blackpool UA                                                     9,541     8.4%

Kingston upon Hull UA                                   15,411   6.8%

East Riding of Yorkshire UA                          23,168   7.8%

North East Lincolnshire UA                          9,927     7.7%

North Lincolnshire UA                                    10,872   7.9%

York UA                                                                10,873   6.1%

Derby UA                                                            15,433   7.5%

Leicester UA                                                      24,459   9.5%

Rutland UA                                                         2,379     7.5%

Nottingham UA                                               16,958   6.4%

Herefordshire County UA                            12,831   8.4%

Telford and Wrekin UA                                 9,834     7.4%

Shropshire UA                                                   19,867   8.0%

Stoke-on-Trent UA                                         15,358   7.9%

Bath and North East Somerset UA            9,907     6.4%

Bristol UA                                                            23,189   5.9%

North Somerset UA                                        14,094   7.6%

South Gloucestershire UA                           14,422   6.3%

Cornwall UA                                                       37,893   8.1%

Plymouth UA                                                     14,805   6.7%

Torbay UA                                                           9,947     8.6%

Bournemouth UA                                            10,006   7.1%

Poole UA                                                             9,052     7.6%

Swindon UA                                                       11,443   6.7%

Wiltshire UA                                                       27,724   7.2%

Peterborough UA                                            10,850   7.6%

Luton UA                                                             12,685   8.2%

Bedford UA                                                        10,228   7.7%

Central Bedfordshire UA                              14,494   6.7%

Southend-on-Sea UA                                     10,646   7.7%

Thurrock UA                                                       8,951     6.7%

Medway UA                                                       14,548   7.0%

Bracknell Forest UA                                        5,833     6.1%

West Berkshire UA                                          8,445     6.7%

Reading UA                                                        7,789     6.0%

Slough UA                                                           9,181     8.8%

Windsor and Maidenhead UA                    8,256     6.9%

Wokingham UA                                                8,408     6.1%

Milton Keynes UA                                           13,397   6.7%

Brighton and Hove UA                                   13,933   6.3%

Portsmouth UA                                                                10,862   6.1%

Southampton UA                                             12,622   6.0%

Isle of Wight UA                                               10,614   8.5%

Source: Yorkshire and Humber Public Health Observatory Diabetes Prevalence Model

Diagnosed diabetes prevalence across the four nations of the United Kingdom are taken from the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) and represents all patients age 17 and older who have been diagnosed with diabetes and included on general practitioner registers.

In 2013/14, QOF showed that there were 3.3 million people aged 17 years and older with diagnosed diabetes with equals 6.2% of this age group. The break down by country can be found in the following table:

Diagnosed diabetes across the four nations of the United Kingdom -2013/14

Number                               %

England                2,814,004                             6.2%

Wales                    177,212                                 6.9%

Scotland               259,986                                 5.9%

Northern Ireland              81,867                   5.3%

United Kingdom               3,333,069             6.2%

Source: Quality and Outcomes Framework (Health and Social Care Information Centre)

Public Health England’s diabetes prevalence model estimates total diabetes prevalence for England and for all local authorities and clinical commissioning groups in England. The model reflects the prevalence of diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed) and adjusts for the age, sex, ethnic group and deprivation pattern of the local population.

The estimated total diabetes prevalence using the diabetes prevalence model is 7.5% in England in 2014.

________________________________________

Mr Barry Sheerman – Diabetes: Health Services

Mon, 19 October 2015 | House of Commons – Written Answer

CONTENTS

Asked by Mr Barry Sheerman (Huddersfield) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of progress by the NHS on implementing the recommendations of the 17th Report of Session 2012-13 of the Public Accounts Committee, The management of adult diabetes services, HC 289; and if he will make a statement.

Answered by:

Jane Ellison Answered on: 19 October 2015

Treasury Minutes: progress report on the implementation of Government accepted recommendations of the Committee of Public Accounts – Sessions 2010-12, 2012-13 and 2013-14 includes the most recent update on progress made by the NHS on implementing the recommendations of the 17th Report of Session 2012-13 of the Public Accounts Committee, The management of adult diabetes services and can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/415600/48383_Cm_9034_Print_Ready.pdf

The management of adult diabetes services in the NHS: progress review, due to be published by the National Audit Office on 21 October, will further assess progress made by the NHS on implementing these recommendations.

________________________________________

Mr Barry Sheerman – Diabetes: Medical Treatments Abroad

Mon, 19 October 2015 | House of Commons – Written Answer

CONTENTS

Asked by Mr Barry Sheerman (Huddersfield) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what comparative assessment he has made of uptake and use by the NHS of new treatments for people living with diabetes with health systems in other EU countries.

Answered by:

Jane Ellison Answered on: 19 October 2015

The Office of Health Economics (OHE) report International Comparison of Medicines Usage: Quantitative Analysis, published last year, showed that uptake of newer and more expensive drugs to treat diabetes was lower than comparator countries. However, uptake of more established therapies was considerably higher.

It is important to note that high use of drugs does not mean more people are cured. There are a number of legitimate factors which influence usage, and therefore variation, such as populations with differing health needs. The Research and Development (RAND) Europe report International variation in drugs usage: an exploratory analysis, published at the same time as the OHE report – seeks to define some of these factors and can be found at the link below:

http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR800/RR899/RAND_RR899.pdf

Our focus is on tackling unjustified variation where it exists.

________________________________________

Jon Trickett – Diagnosis

Mon, 19 October 2015 | House of Commons – Written Answer

CONTENTS

Asked by Jon Trickett (Hemsworth) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to improve rates of early diagnosis for life-threatening illnesses.

Answered by:

Jane Ellison Answered on: 19 October 2015

Public Health England (PHE) runs a range of national social marketing campaigns, based on the best available evidence, to raise awareness of the signs and symptoms of certain life-threatening illnesses and to therefore improve rates of early diagnosis. PHE works closely with the Department and NHS England to ensure that health care professionals are also targeted with campaign information to encourage earlier diagnoses and referrals.

In addition PHE leads the NHS Health Check programme which aims to reduce premature mortality and morbidity and invites anyone aged between 40 and 74 who does not have a pre-existing condition for a check every five years. This programme presents an opportunity to prevent heart attacks and strokes and save lives each year. It can also help prevent people from developing diabetes and detect cases of diabetes or kidney disease earlier, allowing individuals to be better managed and improve their quality of life.

________________________________________

Mr Jim Cunningham – Diabetes

Fri, 16 October 2015 | House of Commons – Written Answer

CONTENTS

Asked by Mr Jim Cunningham (Coventry South) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 17 September 2015 to Question 10120, what additional funding his Department plans to make available to facilitate diabetes care in each of the next five years; and if he will make a statement.

Answered by:

Jane Ellison Answered on: 16 October 2015

The Government is currently undertaking the Spending Review which will set budgets for the Department of Health – along with other parts of the public services- for the remainder of the parliament. The outcomes of the Spending Review will be announced on 25 November. Further details are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/spending-review-2015-a-country-that-lives-within-its-means

Improving outcomes for those at risk of and with diabetes is of great concern to this Government. Building on the National Diabetes Prevention Programme, the Department is developing its plans in this area. These will be published in due course.

________________________________________

Individual Politician Press Releases and Blogs

Keith Vaz MP – Jamie Oliver Addresses a Meeting of the APPG for Diabetes

Thu, 22 October 2015 | MPs Press Release

CONTENTS

On Monday 19th October, Celebrity Chef Jamie Oliver spoke at an All Party Parliamentary Group for Diabetes meeting, shortly after giving evidence to the Health Select Committee for their inquiry into Child Obesity.

Jamie Oliver recently launched a high profile campaign to demonstrate the dangers of overconsuming sugar, and has called for tougher measures to tackle the problem, including a ‘sugar tax’.

Keith said:

“Jamie Oliver’s campaign has shown hundreds of thousands of people how important it is to eat healthily, and I fully support his call for a ‘Sugar Tax’, given the failure of alternative plans to regulate products quite literally packed with sugar and fat.

By spreading awareness in our constituencies, we can ensure small changes in people’s lifestyles make a big difference to their health.”

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