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Weekly diabetes parliamentary round-up

Our weekly diabetes parliamentary round-up is below. To see the full round-up please click for more at the bottom of the post.


 

House of Commons Questions

House of Lords Questions

Jim Shannon – Eyesight: Diseases

Tue, 8 December 2015 | House of Commons – Written Answer
CONTENTS

Asked by Jim Shannon (Strangford) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what medication is available on the NHS to treat (a) diabetes blindness, (b) diabetic retinopathy and (c) macular disease.

Answered by:
Alistair Burt
Answered on: 08 December 2015

Blindness is a rare complication of uncontrolled diabetes. For people with diabetes, the best way to protect their eyesight is to keep blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible and ensure that other associated risk factors such as high blood pressure is treated to minimise the risk of eye complications. There is also a diabetic retinopathy screening programme which is available annually to all people with diabetes aged 12 and over.

Advanced diabetic retinopathy and macular disease may be treated with laser treatment or injections of medicine into the eye.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has issued technology appraisal guidance recommending a number of different medicines for use in the treatment of these conditions. Further information is available at:

http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/conditions-and-diseases/eye-conditions

NHS commissioners are legally required to fund drugs and treatments recommended by NICE technology appraisal guidance.

In addition, clinicians can prescribe any treatment which they consider to be the best available medicine to meet the individual clinical needs of their patient, subject to clinical commissioning groups, who are responsible for the commissioning of ophthalmic services in secondary care, agreeing to fund the treatment.


 

Lord Harrison – Diabetes: Chiropody

Wed, 9 December 2015 | House of Lords – Written Answer

CONTENTS

Asked by Lord Harrison Asked on: 26 November 2015 Department of Health Diabetes: Chiropody Lords HL3958 To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they are changing the availability of podiatric services to diabetics, and if so, based on what criteria.

Lord Prior of Brampton Answered on: 09 December 2015

Podiatry services are commissioned locally by clinical commissioning groups working with local partners and based on the need of the local population, resources available and evidence based practice. These commissioning decisions are informed by the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment and the local Health and Wellbeing Strategy. Clinical networks provide opportunity to adopt and disseminate best practice.


 

Lord Hunt of Kings Heath – Diabetes

Tue, 8 December 2015 | House of Lords – Written Answer
CONTENTS

Asked by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath Asked by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath Asked on: 24 November 2015 Department of Health Diabetes Lords HL3839 To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of whether the current emphasis by NHS Choices on starchy foods such as potatoes, cereals, pasta, rice and bread products for people with diabetes, or who are pre-diabetic, is based on sufficiently rigorous evidence.

Lord Prior of Brampton Answered on: 08 December 2015

The Government takes a whole population approach to healthy eating, and therefore does not provide specific dietary advice to individuals with medical needs. It is recommended for anyone with a medical condition in search of dietary advice to consult their local general practitioner or a dietician.

In July 2015, the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) published its report on Carbohydrates and Health, a review of the latest evidence on dietary carbohydrates and health. This included a review of the evidence on incidence of type 2 diabetes as well as a number of pre-diabetic markers and carbohydrate consumption. SACN continue to recommend that total carbohydrate, which includes starchy foods, should provide approximately 50% total dietary energy. They also advised reducing sugar consumption, increasing fibre consumption and minimising consumption of sugars-sweetened drinks. A copy of the report is attached.

Following publication, advice on what constitutes a healthy balanced diet for the general population, including those with diabetes, was updated on the NHS Choices website reflecting SACN’s recommendations.

Carbohydrates and Health(PDF Document, 2.39 MB)


 

Lord Hunt of Kings Heath – Diabetes

Mon, 7 December 2015 | House of Lords – Written Answer
CONTENTS (Grouped questions)

  1. Asked by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath Asked on: 23 November 2015 Department of Health Diabetes Lords HL3809 To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the evidence on which the current emphasis by NHS Choices on low-fat products or unsaturated fats in dietary advice for people with diabetes, or who are pre-diabetic, is based.

 

  1. Asked by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath Asked on: 23 November 2015 Department of Health Diabetes Lords HL3810 To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the focus in the current dietary advice by NHS Choices to people with diabetes or who are pre-diabetic on the possible benefits of a diet combining protein with low glycemic load carbohydrates.

Lord Prior of Brampton Answered on: 07 December 2015

Public Health England (PHE) advocates a healthy balanced diet for all based on the eatwell plate; the national healthy eating guide. The eatwell plate shows for a healthy balanced diet people should try to eat plenty of starchy foods, fruit and vegetables, some milk, dairy, meat, fish and other non-dairy sources of protein and only small amounts of food and drinks high in fat and/or sugar.

The Government takes a whole population approach to healthy eating, and therefore does not provide specific dietary advice to individuals with medical needs. It is recommended for anyone with a medical condition who is in search of dietary advice to consult their local general practitioner or a dietician.

In July 2015, the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) published its report on Carbohydrates and Health, a review of the latest evidence on dietary carbohydrates and health. SACN recommended reducing sugar consumption, increasing fibre consumption and minimising consumption of sugars-sweetened drinks. A copy of Carbohydrates and Health is attached.

Following publication, advice on what constitutes a healthy balanced diet, for the general population, which includes those with diabetes, was updated to reflect SACN’s recommendations. As part of this, PHE is undertaking a review of the eatwell plate; the refreshed resource will be launched in early 2016.

Carbohydrates and Health(PDF Document, 2.39 MB) Grouped Questions: HL3810


 

Mr Gregory Campbell – Obesity

Mon, 7 December 2015 | House of Commons – Written Answer
CONTENTS

Asked by Mr Gregory Campbell (East Londonderry) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the obesity rate is for (a) adults and (b) children under the age of 16; and what forecast the Government has made of such rates in 2020.

Answered by:
Jane Ellison
Answered on: 07 December 2015

Data published by the Health and Social Care Information Centre in December 2014 showed that in England in 2013 24.9% of adults and 15.2% of children aged from two to 15 years were obese. New data will be published later this month.

The UK Health Forum modelled adult obesity prevalence, ‘Risk factor based modelling for Public Health England’ (2014), and estimated 30% of adults aged 18-100 would be obese by 2020. This was based on Health Survey for England data from 2000 to 2010 and assumes trends continue.

No assessment has been carried out on the likely level of child obesity in 2020 specifically. However, predictions for rates up to 2050 were modelled for both adults and children in the Government’s Foresight report: “Tackling Obesities: Future Choices” (2007) using data from 1994-2004. This modelling suggested that by 2025, 21% of boys aged 6-10 years and 11% of boys aged 11-15 years were predicted to be obese. For girls 6-10 years and 11-15 years, 14% and 22% respectively were predicted to be obese. These predictions assumed that the 1994-2004 trends continued and that no interventions successfully changed the direction of these trends.


 

Jim Shannon – Obesity: Children

Fri, 4 December 2015 | House of Commons – Written Answer
CONTENTS

Asked by Jim Shannon (Strangford) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to tackle obesity in children under 11.

Answered by:
Jane Ellison
Answered on: 04 December 2015

Tackling obesity, particularly in children, is one of our major priorities. Progress has been made in recent years, but we know we have much further to go. We will announce our plans for tackling childhood obesity in the new year.

In the meantime we are continuing to invest in the Change4Life campaign, which provides motivation and support for families to make small but significant improvements to their diets and activity levels. Industry has also taken a range of actions including removing billions of calories and tons of sugar from products and portion sizes have been reduced, but the challenge to industry to make further substantial progress remains.


Individual Politician Press Releases and Blogs

Geraint Davies MP – Geraint Davies MP puts pressure on Government with launch of Sugar Awareness Week

Mon, 7 December 2015 | MPs Press Release
CONTENTS

Launching the National Sugar Awareness Week Geraint Davies Labour MP for Swansea West said

“Eating too much sugar costs the NHS £6billion in obesity and diabetes and the economy £47billion in lost productivity.
“Too much sugar makes lives shorter and less happy. One in four adults is obese and overweight children are often bullied with child obesity doubling by the end of primary school to one in three children.

“We need to take decisive action now. The World Health Association says men should consume no more the nine teaspoonfuls of added sugar – or one can of Coke – and women six -or a light yoghurt. That’s why my Sugar Bill proposes that sugar is labelled in spoonfuls on all food and drink.

“Despite fluoride in our toothpaste and drinking water tooth decay continues to rise in children which is why the British Dental Association is supporting my Bill.

“Fizzy drinks accounts for 40% of children’s sugar intake so should be taxed to encourage switching to water or artificial sweeteners. This would raise between half a billion and a billion pounds and dramatically cut NHS costs so savings could be used for cheaper fresh food for poorer communities.

“I’m pleased that Tesco and the British Retail Association supported the launch as retailers must support the drive towards sugar awareness and controlling irresponsible promotions. My sugar bill says that high-sugar products should not be allowed to be promoted as low-fat to masquerade as healthy.

“The parliamentary launch was organised by Action Against Sugar and supported by Public Health England.
“Dentists and doctors will be e mailed to encourage them to ask their MPs to support my bill and put pressure on the Government to strengthen their proposals due in January.”

Geraint Davies MP talking about sugar and children’s tooth decay with The President of the British Dental Association

Geraint Davies MP talking about sugar and children’s tooth decay with The President of the British Dental Association

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