Article

Diabetes in Parliament: 12th-18th March

House of Commons

House of Commons Questions

Diabetes – DH – Keith Vaz

Mon, 14 March 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer
CONTENTS

Asked by Keith Vaz (Leicester East) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of Type 2 diabetics manage their condition with (a) insulin injections and (b) insulin tablets.

Answered by:
Jane Ellison
Answered on: 14 March 2016

Information is not collected centrally on the number of people prescribed a medicine or the medical condition being treated.

Budget 2016

Full text of what George Osborne said on the sugar levy:

Mr Deputy Speaker, You cannot have a long term plan for the country unless you have a long term plan for our children’s healthcare.

Here are the facts we know. Five year old children are consuming their body weight in sugar every year. Experts predict that within a generation over half of all boys, and 70% of girls could be overweight or obese. Here’s another fact that we all know. Obesity drives disease. It increases the risk of cancer, diabetes and heart disease – and it costs our economy £27 billion a year; that’s more than half the entire NHS paybill.

And here’s another truth we all know. One of the biggest contributors to childhood obesity is sugary drinks. A can of cola typically has nine teaspoons of sugar in it. Some popular drinks have as many as 13. That can be more than double a child’s recommended added sugar intake. Let me give credit where credit is due. Many in the soft drinks industry recognise there’s a problem and have started to reformulate their products. Robinsons recently removed added sugar from many of their cordials and squashes. Sainsbury’s, Tesco and the Co-op have all committed to reduce sugar across their ranges. So industry can act, and with the right incentives I’m sure it will.

Mr Deputy Speaker, I am not prepared to look back at my time here in this Parliament, doing this job and say to my children’s generation: I’m sorry. We knew there was a problem with sugary drinks. We knew it caused disease. But we ducked the difficult decisions and we did nothing.

So today I can announce that we will introduce a new sugar levy on the soft drinks industry. Let me explain how it will work. It will be levied on the companies. It will be introduced in two years’ time to give companies plenty of space to change their product mix. It will be assessed on the volume of the sugar-sweetened drinks they produce or import.

There will be two bands – one for total sugar content above 5 grams per 100 millilitres; a second, higher band for the most sugary drinks with more than 8 grams per 100 millilitres. Pure fruit juices and milk-based drinks will be excluded, and we’ll ensure the smallest producers are kept out of scope.

We will of course consult on implementation. We’re introducing the levy on the industry which means they can reduce the sugar content of their products – as many already do. It means they can promote low-sugar or no sugar brands – as many already are. They can take these perfectly reasonable steps to help with children’s health.

Of course, some may choose to pass the price onto consumers and that will be their decision, and this would have an impact on consumption too. We understand that tax affects behaviour. So let’s tax the things we want to reduce, not the things we want to encourage.

The OBR estimate that this levy will raise £520 million. And this is tied directly to the second thing we’re going to do today to help children’s health and wellbeing. We’re going to use the money from this new levy to double the amount of funding we dedicate to sport in every primary school. And for secondary schools we’re going to fund longer school days for those that want to offer their pupils a wider range of activities, including extra sport. It will be voluntary for schools. Compulsory for the pupils. There will be enough resources for a quarter of secondary schools to take part – but that’s just a start. The devolved administrations will receive equivalent funding through the Barnett formula – and I hope they spend it on the next generation too.

I’m also using the LIBOR funds specifically to help with children’s’ hospital services. Members across the House have asked for resources for children’s’ care in Manchester, Sheffield, Birmingham and Southampton and we provide those funds today. A determination to improve the health of our children. A new levy on excessive sugar in soft drinks. The money used to double sport in our schools. A Britain fit for the future. We’re not afraid to put the next generation first.

House of Lords

Diabetes – DH – Lord Harrison

Mon, 14 March 2016 | House of Lords – Written Answer
CONTENTS

Asked by Lord Harrison Asked by Lord Harrison Asked on: 01 March 2016 Department of Health Diabetes Lords HL6586 To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the current primary performance management mechanism through which NHS England hold Clinical Commissioning Groups to account for achieving progress in diabetes service improvement and quality of care.

Lord Prior of Brampton Answered on: 14 March 2016

NHS England and Monitor are working closely together to ensure that the payment system supports service developments in the vanguard sites (including those where integrated diabetes care is a focus) as well as monitoring local innovative approaches to supporting integrated care taken by some clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). This is to ensure that the payment system keeps abreast with the development of future service models and is not a barrier to the development of new models of care.

During 2016/17, NHS England will look at the current incentives and funding arrangements for diabetes to see how greater alignment could be achieved between the financial incentives for primary and secondary care.

Information on how much money the National Health Service invested in structured education for diabetes patients is not collected centrally.

Under the Health and Social Care Act (2012), NHS England has a statutory duty to conduct an annual assessment of every CCG. Since April 2013, CCGs have been assessed twice, for the period 2013/14 and for 2014/15.

For 2016/17, NHS England will introduce a new CCG Improvement and Assessment Framework (CCG IAF). This new framework will align with NHS England’s mandate and planning process, with the aim of driving improvements in a number of key areas including the management and care of people with diabetes.

NHS England has been working with Diabetes UK on including diabetes indicators in the CCG IAF. The proposed diabetes indicators are:

– the percentage of diabetes patients that have achieved all three of the National Institute for Heath and Care Excellence recommended treatment targets; and

– newly diagnosed diabetes patients referred to, or attending, a structured education course.

Under the proposals, diabetes will also be one of the six clinical priority areas in the CCG IAF that will be overseen by an independent group.

The CCG IAF proposals are subject to the outcome of an engagement process which closed for comments on February 26 2016. More information can be found at:

href=”https://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/ccg-improvmnt/” target=”_blank”>https://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/ccg-improvmnt/

 

Diabetes: Health Education – DH – Lord Harrison

Mon, 14 March 2016 | House of Lords – Written Answer
CONTENTS

Asked by Lord Harrison Asked by Lord Harrison Asked on: 01 March 2016 Department of Health Diabetes: Health Education Lords HL6585 To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much money the NHS invested in ensuring access to and provision of structured education for diabetes patients in (1) 2013, (2) 2014 and (3) 2015, and what percentage those figures represent of total NHS spend on diabetes during each year.

Lord Prior of Brampton Answered on: 14 March 2016

NHS England and Monitor are working closely together to ensure that the payment system supports service developments in the vanguard sites (including those where integrated diabetes care is a focus) as well as monitoring local innovative approaches to supporting integrated care taken by some clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). This is to ensure that the payment system keeps abreast with the development of future service models and is not a barrier to the development of new models of care.

During 2016/17, NHS England will look at the current incentives and funding arrangements for diabetes to see how greater alignment could be achieved between the financial incentives for primary and secondary care.

Information on how much money the National Health Service invested in structured education for diabetes patients is not collected centrally.

Under the Health and Social Care Act (2012), NHS England has a statutory duty to conduct an annual assessment of every CCG. Since April 2013, CCGs have been assessed twice, for the period 2013/14 and for 2014/15.

For 2016/17, NHS England will introduce a new CCG Improvement and Assessment Framework (CCG IAF). This new framework will align with NHS England’s mandate and planning process, with the aim of driving improvements in a number of key areas including the management and care of people with diabetes.

NHS England has been working with Diabetes UK on including diabetes indicators in the CCG IAF. The proposed diabetes indicators are:

– the percentage of diabetes patients that have achieved all three of the National Institute for Heath and Care Excellence recommended treatment targets; and

– newly diagnosed diabetes patients referred to, or attending, a structured education course.

Under the proposals, diabetes will also be one of the six clinical priority areas in the CCG IAF that will be overseen by an independent group.

The CCG IAF proposals are subject to the outcome of an engagement process which closed for comments on February 26 2016. More information can be found at:

href=”https://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/ccg-improvmnt/” target=”_blank”>https://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/ccg-improvmnt/

 

Diabetes – DH – Lord Harrison

Mon, 14 March 2016 | House of Lords – Written Answer
CONTENTS

Asked by Lord Harrison Asked by Lord Harrison Asked on: 01 March 2016 Department of Health Diabetes Lords HL6583 To ask Her Majesty’s Government what work NHS England and Monitor are undertaking to develop new payment and incentives mechanisms that drive integrated care for diabetes across primary and secondary care settings; and what is the time frame for any new proposals to be published.

Lord Prior of Brampton Answered on: 14 March 2016

NHS England and Monitor are working closely together to ensure that the payment system supports service developments in the vanguard sites (including those where integrated diabetes care is a focus) as well as monitoring local innovative approaches to supporting integrated care taken by some clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). This is to ensure that the payment system keeps abreast with the development of future service models and is not a barrier to the development of new models of care.

During 2016/17, NHS England will look at the current incentives and funding arrangements for diabetes to see how greater alignment could be achieved between the financial incentives for primary and secondary care.

Information on how much money the National Health Service invested in structured education for diabetes patients is not collected centrally.

Under the Health and Social Care Act (2012), NHS England has a statutory duty to conduct an annual assessment of every CCG. Since April 2013, CCGs have been assessed twice, for the period 2013/14 and for 2014/15.

For 2016/17, NHS England will introduce a new CCG Improvement and Assessment Framework (CCG IAF). This new framework will align with NHS England’s mandate and planning process, with the aim of driving improvements in a number of key areas including the management and care of people with diabetes.

NHS England has been working with Diabetes UK on including diabetes indicators in the CCG IAF. The proposed diabetes indicators are:

– the percentage of diabetes patients that have achieved all three of the National Institute for Heath and Care Excellence recommended treatment targets; and

– newly diagnosed diabetes patients referred to, or attending, a structured education course.

Under the proposals, diabetes will also be one of the six clinical priority areas in the CCG IAF that will be overseen by an independent group.

The CCG IAF proposals are subject to the outcome of an engagement process which closed for comments on February 26 2016. More information can be found at:

href=”https://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/ccg-improvmnt/” target=”_blank”>https://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/ccg-improvmnt/

Diabetes: Nurses – DH – Lord Harrison

Mon, 14 March 2016 | House of Lords – Written Answer
CONTENTS

Asked by Lord Harrison Asked by Lord Harrison Asked on: 01 March 2016 Department of Health Diabetes: Nurses Lords HL6584 To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many diabetes specialist nurses are currently employed by (1) each Clinical Commissioning Group area, and (2) each hospital trust, in England.

Lord Prior of Brampton Answered on: 14 March 2016

The Health and Social Care Information Centre provides information on the number of nursing, midwifery and health visiting staff employed in the National Health Service in England but it does not separately identify diabetes specialist nurses.

It is for local NHS organisations with their knowledge of the healthcare needs of their local population to invest in training for specialist skills and to deploy specialist nurses.

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