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Diabetes in Parliament: 15th – 22nd April

Diabetes: Chiropody

House of Commons – Written Answers – Department of Health

Answered on: Friday 22 April 2016

Health

Paula Sherriff: What steps his Department is taking to improve inpatient foot care for people with diabetes who are admitted to hospital. [33874]

Jane Ellison:

The National Inpatient Diabetes Audit has demonstrated yearly improvements in inpatient foot care. The 2013 report found that more patients were having foot examinations on admission to hospital and the number of hospitals with multidisciplinary foot care teams had increased. There had also been a significant reduction in hospital acquired foot problems.

A number of steps are being taken to continue to improve foot care for people with diabetes admitted to hospital.

The Department has made achieving a measurable reduction in variation in the management and care of people with diabetes by 2020 a mandate objective for NHS England. Improving foot care for people with diabetes is an important part of achieving this objective. NHS England will support clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) and providers in identifying the steps they need to take to improve outcomes for patients with diabetes, including foot care services for inpatients.

Improvements in outcomes for patients with diabetes will be monitored as part of the CCG Improvement and Assessment Framework. The National Diabetes Foot Care Audit, the first of which was published in March, provides data on all diabetes foot care services. This will enable all foot care services to measure their performance against the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence clinical guidelines and peer units, and to monitor adverse outcomes for people who develop diabetic foot disease.


Chronic Illnesses: Pharmacy

House of Commons – Written Answers – Department of Health

Answered on: Friday 22 April 2016

Health

Royston Smith: What steps he plans to take to allow community pharmacies to care for patients with long-term health conditions through (a) medical reviews and (b) other assistance with that condition. [34116]

Alistair Burt:

Community pharmacies already take significant steps to care for patients with long term conditions (LTCS). Community pharmacy staff routinely deliver a range of services to meet the needs of patients with LTCs, including timely dispensing of medicines, opportunistic and prescription-linked public health interventions, such as advice on a healthy diet and nutrition, stop smoking advice to help maintain the health of people with LTCs such as diabetes and heart disease, support for self-care and signposting, when they are not able to provide the support themselves.

In addition, community pharmacists provide advice on the safe use of medicines so they are taken as intended, through medicines use reviews and the new medicines service, the latter intended for people with certain LTCs prescribed new medicines. Utilising pharmacists clinical skills assists with optimising medicines in a way which puts patients at the centre of decision making, with regular monitoring and review, helping to improve their health outcomes.

The Government’s vision is for a more efficient, modern system that will free up pharmacists to spend more time delivering clinical and public health services to the benefit of patients, including those with LTCs, and the public.


Public Health

House of Commons – Written Answers – Department of Health

Answered on: Wednesday 20 April 2016

Health

Catherine West: What preventative programmes, other than for HIV prevention, are funded by Public Health England. [34242]

Jane Ellison:

Public Health England (PHE) distributes the public health grant to local authorities; the grant funds a number of prevention programmes including NHS Health Checks, the national child measurement programme and sexual health services. PHE also provides social marketing campaigns such as Be Clear on Cancer, Stoptober and Act FAST.

In addition PHE provides advice and evidence to local authorities and NHS England on what works best, including providing expert advice on the diabetes prevention programme.

More information on PHE’s activities can be found in PHE’s Strategic Plan:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/516985/PHE_Strategic_plan_2016.pdf

which sets out how the organisation intends to protect and improve the public’s health and reduce inequalities over the next four years and outlines actions PHE will take over the next year to achieve these aims and deliver its core functions.


Soft Drinks: Taxation

House of Commons – Written Answers – HM Treasury

Answered on: Wednesday 20 April 2016

Treasury

Iain Stewart: What information his Department holds on which other European countries have introduced a soft drinks industry levy in the last five years; and what research the Government has commissioned or undertaken on the effects of such levies on levels of obesity. [33710]

Damian Hinds:

Other European countries have introduced a soft drinks tax in recent years. For example, Hungary in 2011 and France in 2012.

These taxes however are not identical in design to the new soft drinks industry levy the Chancellor announced at Budget 2016. The levy is a lever to encourage producer-led reformulation.

The Chief Medical Officer has said that reformulation is a key win for tackling obesity and soft drinks are the single largest source of sugar intake for children and teenagers.

This levy will be an important part of the government’s comprehensive childhood obesity strategy.


Diabetes: Health Services

House of Commons – Written Answers – Department of Health

Answered on: Monday 18 April 2016

Health

Mr Gregory Campbell: What assessment his Department has made of the effect of trends in diabetes incidence on changes in medical provision for people with diabetes. [33696]

Jane Ellison:

Both the prevalence and incidence of Type 2 diabetes has been rising, driven by increasing obesity and an ageing population. The numbers of people diagnosed with the condition are projected to grow from 2.9 million in 2014/15 to 4.6 million by 2030. In addition, a further 5 million people are estimated to be at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

The Government is therefore committed to introducing a national Type 2 diabetes prevention programme and improving the management and care of people with diabetes within the lifetime of this parliament. These commitments are reflected in Government’s 2016/17 mandate to NHS England. This is in the context of our wider public health programme to prevent disease and promote good health which includes a strong focus on tackling obesity, one of the most common, modifiable risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes. For example, the announcement for a soft drinks industry levy by the Chancellor in the budget is the first step in this Government’s comprehensive childhood obesity strategy, which we will be launching in the summer.


Soft Drinks: Corporation Tax

House of Commons – Written Answers – HM Treasury

Answered on: Wednesday 20 April 2016

Treasury

Iain Stewart: What amount of corporation tax was paid by soft drinks manufacturers in the latest financial year for which figures are available. [33707]

Mr David Gauke:

Corporation Tax payable for accounting periods ending in the financial year 2013-14 for companies manufacturing soft drinks, and producing mineral water is estimated to be about £70 million. This estimate is based on those classified under the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) 2007 code 11070 (Manufacture of soft drinks; production of mineral waters and other bottled waters) plus those manufacturing soft drinks who are classified elsewhere. This is the latest year available.


Soft Drinks: Taxation

House of Commons – Written Answers – HM Treasury

Answered on: Wednesday 20 April 2016

Treasury

Iain Stewart: If he will publish modelling conducted by his Department on the potential effect of the soft drinks industry levy on corporation tax receipts. [33708]

Damian Hinds:

The independent Office of Budget Responsibility publishes the policy costing and forecast of the tax receipts at every fiscal event, which contain the relevant economic analysis.


Pupils: Disadvantaged

House of Commons – Written Answers – Department for Education

Answered on: Monday 18 April 2016

Education

Julie Cooper: If the Government will make it its policy to allocate revenue raised from the soft drinks industry levy to maintain the grant for summer schools. [32937]

Mr Sam Gyimah:

The Government has no plans to use the soft drink levy to maintain the grant for pupil premium summer schools. The 2016 budget statement identified that the soft drinks industry levy would be used to double the amount of funding to £320m per annum that we dedicate to sport in every primary school and to make it easier for up to a quarter of secondary schools to extend their school day to include a wider range of activities, including extra sport.

The Government has protected the pupil premium at current per pupil rates for the rest of the Parliament, providing schools with around £2.5 billion per year of additional funding to support their disadvantaged pupils. Schools have the choice to continue running summer schools and can use their pupil premium allocation to fund places for their disadvantaged pupils.

 

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