Article

Diabetes in Parliament:16th – 24rd September

House of Commons Questions

Diabetes: Nurses – DH – Keith Vaz

Mon, 19 September 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

  1. Asked by Keith Vaz (Leicester East) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many diabetes specialist nurses are employed by the NHS.
  1. Asked by Keith Vaz (Leicester East) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps the Government is taking to recruit more diabetes specialist nurses

Answered by: (Grouped answer)
Mr Philip Dunne
Answered on: 19 September 2016

NHS Digital provides information on the number of nursing, midwifery and health visiting staff employed in the National Health Service in England but it does not separately identify diabetes specialist nurses.

It is for local NHS organisations with their knowledge of the healthcare needs of their local population to invest in training for specialist skills such as diabetes nursing and to deploy specialist nurses.


Diabetes: Health Services – DH – Keith Vaz

Fri, 16 September 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

  1. Asked by Keith Vaz (Leicester East) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what progress has been made on reducing required variations in the care provided to people with diabetes.
  1. Asked by Keith Vaz (Leicester East) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to ensure access to structured education for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
  1. Asked by Keith Vaz (Leicester East) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans his Department has to make continuous glucose monitoring and insulin pump technology available to diabetics on the NHS.

Answered by: (Grouped answer)
Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 16 September 2016

This Government is working hard to improve outcomes and quality of life for those already living with diabetes and those who will develop it in the coming years. One of our key goals in the mandate to the National Health Service is a measurable reduction in variation in the management and care of people with the condition within the lifetime of this Parliament. Funding has been secured through the spending review to help achieve this and NHS England is developing a programme to ensure that those clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) which need extra investment in this area, accompanied by sound plans for delivery, receive it.

In addition, the Clinical Commissioning Group Improvement and Assessment Framework will play a key role in delivering this as it contains two recognised evidence based measures of whether patients with diabetes are being supported to successfully manage their condition (achievement of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence treatment targets and participation in structured education programmes).

Using data from the NHS Atlas of Variation, NHS Right Care is also working with CCGs and other local partners to make improvements in diabetes care and reduce variation by providing hands on practical support.

Since 2009/10, there has been an almost 70% increase in the proportion of people newly diagnosed with diabetes recorded as being referred to structured education courses, designed to help them manage their condition in the long term. However, whilst we know that the data on take up needs improving, there is still much further to go in enabling people with diabetes to access these programmes.

The Department, NHS England and Diabetes UK are working on ways to improve the take up of structured education including exploring how more diversity of provision might be delivered through digital and web based approaches. The Department recently held a seminar with key stakeholders to identify actions that would facilitate improved access.

CCGs are primarily responsible for commissioning diabetes services to meet the requirements of their population. In doing so, CCGs need to ensure that the services they provide are fit for purpose, reflect the needs of the local population, are based on the available evidence, taking into account national guidelines. This should include consideration of access to continuous glucose monitoring for people with Type 1 diabetes who might benefit from it.


Obesity: Children – DH – Dr Lisa Cameron

Fri, 16 September 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Dr Lisa Cameron (East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to the Government’s recently-published childhood obesity action plan, how he plans to work with the public health community to ensure that approaches to reduce child obesity are evidence-based.

Answered by:
Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 16 September 2016

The policies in the plan are informed by the latest research and evidence, including from the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition report Carbohydrates and Health, Public Health England’s evidence package Sugar reduction: the evidence for action, other government departments, debates in this House and various reports from key stakeholders including the Health Select Committee.

In delivering the plan, we will continue to work with the public health community and other partners to ensure implementation is aligned to our proposals.

Copies of Carbohydrates and Health and Sugar reduction: the evidence for action are attached and are available at:

www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/445503/SACN_Carbohydrates_and_Health.pdf

www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/470179/Sugar_reduction_The_evidence_for_action.pdf

SACN Carbohydrates and Health(PDF Document, 2.39 MB) PHE Sugar reduction The evidence for action(PDF Document, 1.16 MB)


Points of Order

House of Lords

Schools: Health Education – DfE – Lord Roberts of Llandudno

Mon, 19 September 2016 | House of Lords – Written Answer

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno Asked on: 06 September 2016 Department for Education Schools: Health Education Lords HL1628 To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the case for patients who have certain medical conditions, such as diabetes, mental health problems or other illnesses, to go into schools to talk to children about those conditions, to give them a better understanding of the nature of those illnesses.

Lord Nash Answered on: 19 September 2016

The national ‎curriculum sets the expectation that pupils study personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education in maintained schools and academies are encouraged to teach it as part of a broad and balanced curriculum.

Schools and teachers should decide what to teach based on their pupils’ needs, and taking account of pupil and parent views, when planning health education as part of PSHE.

We believe that schools are best placed to decide whether they draw on the support of patients or resources using patients’ perspectives when delivering PSHE.

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