Article

Diabetes in Parliament: 2nd – 9th December

House of Commons Questions

Food: Sugar – DH – Keith Vaz

Tue, 6 December 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Keith Vaz (Leicester East) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he plans to take to prevent an increase in the sugar content of food and drink products after the EU sugar quotas are lifted in 2017.

Answered by:
Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 06 December 2016

As set out in the Childhood Obesity Plan, published in August 2016, Public Health England is working with all parts of the food industry to encourage businesses to remove 20% of sugar from the nine categories of foods that contribute most to children’s diets by 2020 with an initial 5% reduction by August 2017. Progress will be regularly and transparently monitored.

The removal of European Union sugar beet quotas will allow British growers to move towards competing on a level playing field with other sugar producers around the world.


Sugar: Imports – Defra – Keith Vaz

Fri, 2 December 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Keith Vaz (Leicester East) To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions her Department has had with the Department of Health on the potential health implications of the lifting of EU sugar quotas.

Answered by:
George Eustice
Answered on: 02 December 2016

The removal of EU sugar beet quotas will allow British growers to move towards competing with other sugar producers around the world. The Government’s Childhood Obesity Plan includes a range of actions to support families in reducing their sugar consumption, including a new Soft Drinks Industry Levy on sugary drinks and a challenge to industry to reduce 20% of sugar from the products that contribute most sugar to children’s diets by 2020. Defra meets regularly with the Department for Health and Public Health England to discuss these and other issues.


Diabetes – DH – Andrew Gwynne

Wed, 7 December 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

The following question to the Department of Health was answered on 07 December 2016

  1. Asked by Andrew Gwynne (Denton and Reddish) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what advice his Department offers to GPs on the aftercare of diabetic patients.
  2. Asked by Andrew Gwynne (Denton and Reddish) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will make it his Department’s policy to require all GP practices to refer Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic patients (a) to podiatry services, (b) for blood testing and (c) for eye checks; and if he will make a statement.
  3. Asked by Andrew Gwynne (Denton and Reddish) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what advice his Department offers to hospital trusts on the aftercare of diabetic patients.

Answered by:
Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 07 December 2016

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are primarily responsible for commissioning services to meet the requirements of their population including Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes services. In doing so, CCGs need to ensure that the services they provide are fit for purpose, reflect the needs of the local population and are based on the available evidence and take into account national guidelines.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has published a wealth of guidance on the management and care of people with diabetes including the recently updated guidelines for the management of Type 2 diabetes in adults which are available at:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng28/resources/type-2-diabetes-in-adults-management-1837338615493

It recommends that all people with diabetes should receive an annual health check to monitor and manage their condition, as well as reduce the risk of associated complications, such as heart, kidney and eye disease and amputations. These annual checks, some of which include blood tests, monitor body mass index, blood pressure, blood glucose, cholesterol and signs of early complications (e.g. surveillance for foot, eye and kidney disease). They provide the cornerstone of routine care for people with diabetes and the majority are incentivised through the Quality and Outcomes Framework which is a voluntary annual reward and incentive programme for all general practitioner surgeries in England, detailing practice achievement results.

The foot check enables health care professional to annually assess the risk of diabetic foot disease in people with diabetes. Guidelines help then to decide when to refer cases to a multidisciplinary foot care service or foot protection service (both of which include a podiatrist) for those identified at moderate or high risk. This is outlined in the NICE Guideline on Diabetic foot problems: prevention and management which can be found at:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng19

The national diabetic retinopathy screening programme provides an opportunity for all people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes to have an annual eye check.


 Obesity – DH – Craig Whittaker

Thu, 8 December 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

 

Asked by Craig Whittaker (Calder Valley) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of strategies local authorities have in place to tackle (a) childhood and (b) adult obesity.

Answered by:
Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 08 December 2016

Local authorities (LA) have access to the National Child Measurement Programme and NHS Health Checks to identify, monitor and help inform the needs of their local child and adult populations. Public Health England (PHE) will continue to work with LAs on public health approaches that support evidence based and place-based approaches, including the Sustainability Transformation Plans, whilst delivering the actions outlined in the Government’s Childhood Obesity Plan.

Local authorities continue to invest in a breadth of approaches to tackle obesity, including work to improve the local food offer in public places; create healthier built environments; and provide weight management services to children and adults looking to achieve a healthier weight.

PHE are supporting local authorities to implement effective strategies by developing accessible resources and toolkits that support local authorities to take a place-based and whole systems approach to tackling obesity.


Milk: Consumption – DH – Mr George Howarth

Wed, 7 December 2016 | House of Commons – Written Answer

The following question to the Department of Health was answered on 07 December 2016

  1. Asked by Mr George Howarth (Knowsley) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of the revisions to the Eatwell Guide on levels of milk consumption among children.
  2. Asked by Mr George Howarth (Knowsley) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what analysis Public Health England conducted on the potential effect of the changes to the Eatwell Guide’s recommendations on milk consumption on obesity in children.

Answered by:
Nicola Blackwood
Answered on: 07 December 2016

There has been no assessment made directly addressing the effect of the revised Eatwell Guide on milk consumption by children or the effect of the changes on childhood obesity. Government advice continues to encourage consumption of milk and dairy products as part of a healthy, balanced diet for all age groups.


 

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