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Weekly diabetes parliamentary round-up

MPs debate the Soft Drinks Industry Levy and Funding for Sport in Schools

MPs debate NHS and Social Care Funding

House of Commons Questions

Kidney Diseases – DH – Andrew Rosindell

Wed, 11 January 2017 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Andrew Rosindell (Romford) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to improve the diagnosis and treatment of kidney failure in the UK.

Answered by: David Mowat Answered on: 11 January 2017

As health is a devolved matter, steps being taken to improve the diagnosis and treatment of kidney failure in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland would be a matter for the administrations of those countries respectively.

In England, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance Chronic kidney (CKD) disease in adults: assessment and management, updated in July 2014, sets out best practice for clinicians in the management of CKD. The guidance covers identification and monitoring of patients at risk; pharmacological management and referral where appropriate, and aims to ensure patients remain healthy and avoid kidney failure, if possible. In August 2013, NICE published Acute kidney injury: prevention, detection and management. The guidance emphasises early intervention and stresses the importance of risk assessment and prevention, early recognition and treatment to avoid kidney failure. Both sets of guidance can be found at the following links:

www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg182/resources/chronic-kidney-disease-in-adults-assessment-and-management-35109809343205

www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg169/resources/acute-kidney-injury-prevention-detection-and-management-35109700165573

In addition to putting in place evidence based guidance to support clinicians to diagnose problems of the kidney, we are also working to detect people at risk of kidney disease. The NHS Health Check programme, which launched in 2008, is a universal and systematic programme for everyone between the ages of 40-74 years (not already on a chronic disease register) that assesses people’s health and risk of developing certain health problems. It is estimated that the programme could detect at least 20,000 cases of diabetes or kidney disease earlier, allowing individuals to be better managed and to improve their quality of life.


Heart Diseases: Drugs – DH – Nic Dakin

Mon, 9 January 2017 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Nic Dakin (Scunthorpe) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to improve patient access to PCSK9 inhibitors and other NICE-recommended cardiovascular disease medicines.

Answered by: David Mowat Answered on: 09 January 2017

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has appraised the PCSK9 inhibitors alirocumab (Praluent) and evolocumab (Repatha) for treating primary hypercholesterolaemia and mixed dyslipidaemia. In June 2016, NICE issued final technology appraisal guidance recommending both treatments, subject to certain criteria. Further information is available at:

www.nice.org.uk/guidance/conditions-and-diseases/diabetes-and-other-endocrinal–nutritional-and-metabolic-conditions/lipid-disorders

National Health Service Commissioners are legally required to fund drugs and treatments recommended in NICE technology appraisal guidance, including those for cardiovascular disease, within three months of final guidance being issued.


Obesity: Children – DH – Mrs Sharon Hodgson

Wed, 11 January 2017 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Mrs Sharon Hodgson (Washington and Sunderland West) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 16 December 2016 to Question 57118, what plans he has to meet (a) the Food Innovation Network and (b) the Agri-Food Technology Council to discuss the delivery of the childhood obesity strategy.

Answered by: Nicola Blackwood Answered on: 11 January 2017

There are no current plans for Ministers to meet the Agri-Food Technology Leadership Council or Food Innovation Network. Officials will continue to work with these groups and other stakeholders in the delivery of the Childhood Obesity Strategy.


Obesity: Children – DH – Mrs Sharon Hodgson

Wed, 11 January 2017 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Mrs Sharon Hodgson (Washington and Sunderland West) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, who he, his ministerial colleagues and officials have met since 18 August 2016 to discuss Childhood Obesity: a plan for action, published on that date.

Answered by: Nicola Blackwood Answered on: 11 January 2017

Details of all Ministerial meetings with external stakeholders are published quarterly in arrears on the GOV.UK website. The latest publication up to the end of September 2016 is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-external-meetings-2016

Details of meetings between Department officials and external stakeholders are not collected centrally.


Sugar: Food – DH – Mrs Sharon Hodgson

Wed, 11 January 2017 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Mrs Sharon Hodgson (Washington and Sunderland West) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what progress has been made in reducing the sugar content of products for babies and young children.

Answered by: Nicola Blackwood Answered on: 11 January 2017

Public Health England (PHE) is responsible for the sugar reduction and wider reformulation programme, a key commitment in the Government’s Childhood Obesity Plan. PHE will work with all sectors of the food industry (retailers, manufacturers and the eating out of the home sector) to reduce the amount of sugar in the foods that contribute most to children’s diets by 20% by 2020, with a 5% reduction in the first year. This initially focuses the programme on yoghurts, biscuits, cakes, morning goods (for example croissants and pastries), puddings, ice-cream, breakfast cereals, confectionery and sweet spreads. Products that are intended for consumption by babies and young children are included in PHE’s programme and will be considered in further detail in spring 2017. Infant formula is excluded from this programme since its composition is governed by legislation.


Free Schools: Standards – DfE – Mrs Sharon Hodgson

Wed, 11 January 2017 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Mrs Sharon Hodgson (Washington and Sunderland West) To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 16 December 2016 to Question 57119, what progress she has made in ensuring that academies and free schools meet the School Food Standards since the publication of Childhood Obesity: a plan for action.

Answered by: Edward Timpson Answered on: 11 January 2017

We are working through the best course of action on this issue. The Secretary of State has had no meetings to date. As the minister responsible for school food, I attended the School Food Plan Alliance meeting on 6 December. Departmental officials are meeting with the School Food Plan Alliance, School Food Matters and other stakeholders in the new year to discuss options.

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