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Weekly diabetes parliamentary round-up

House of Commons Questions

Hypertension – DH – Jim Shannon

Fri, 10 February 2017 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Jim Shannon (Strangford) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what recent steps the NHS has taken to tackle trends in blood pressure related complaints among people in their 50s.

Answered by: Nicola Blackwood Answered on: 10 February 2017

In 2016, NHS RightCare published its Cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention optimal value pathway, which outlines best practice care pathways to help improve CVD prevention, including opportunities to better detect, diagnose and control cases of high blood pressure. The pathway can be viewed here:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/rightcare/intel/cfv/cvd-pathway/

NHS England’s National Clinical Director for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention launched a new resource for clinical commissioning groups and general practitioners (GPs) ‘Blood Pressure – How Can We Do Better?’ It was developed by GPs, nurses and pharmacists working with partners including NHS England, Public Health England, the British Heart Foundation, the Stroke Association and the Royal College of General Practitioners. It can be accessed at:

https://www.bhf.org.uk/bp-how-can-we-do-better

NHS England is a member of the Blood Pressure System Leadership Board, established by Public Health England, to help drive improvements in the prevention, detection and management of high blood pressure.

The NHS Health Check is a national programme that aims to prevent heart disease, stroke, diabetes and kidney disease, and raise awareness of dementia both across the population and within high risk and vulnerable groups. Between April 2013 and September 2016, 4.9 million people have benefitted from a blood pressure check as part of their NHS Health Check. Evaluation of the programme demonstrated that one case of hypertension is diagnosed in every 27 people receiving a check.


Diabetes: Health Education – DH – Jim Shannon

Wed, 8 February 2017 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Jim Shannon (Strangford) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to reduce the number of people diagnosed with diabetes.

Answered by: Nicola Blackwood Answered on: 08 February 2017

The National Health Service Diabetes Prevention Programme (NHS DPP) is a joint commitment from NHS England, Public Health England and Diabetes United Kingdom, to deliver at scale evidence based behavioural interventions for individuals identified as being at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

The NHS DPP operates through a national framework of providers able to deliver a nine month structured programme of behaviour and lifestyle interventions, tailored to personal need. Local health economies select their preferred provider and work with them to ensure the content responds to the needs of the local population demographics, and to generate the referrals. The intervention is group based behavioural coaching, includes advice on the risks of diabetes and support to achieve personal goals related to a healthy weight, nutrition and reaching the Chief Medical Officer’s recommended levels of physical activity.

The NHS DPP supports people to take control of their own health to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Eligible individuals have a raised blood sugar associated with risk factors such as age, ethnicity or high Body Mass Index.

To the end of November 2016 13,383 at risk individuals had been referred to the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme. By 2020 up to 100,000 individuals per year will be able to access the service.


NHS: Standards – DH – Mr Kevan Jones

Mon, 6 February 2017 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Mr Kevan Jones (North Durham) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what guidance his Department issues to clinical commissioning groups on implementation of quality statements made by NICE published in Quality Standards.

Answered by: Nicola Blackwood Answered on: 06 February 2017

The Department has not issued any guidance to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) on implementation of National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) quality standards.

NHS England has advised that NICE guidance, including quality standards, is built into advice provided to commissioners on specific clinical areas of work as appropriate. For example, the End of Life Commissioning Toolkit, published April 2016, supports delivery of the NICE Quality Standard on end of life care in adults and is published at:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/nhsiq-comms-eolc-tlkit-.pdf

In addition, as part of the current Diabetes Treatment and Care transformation funding bidding process, part of the scoring criteria for bids includes consideration of the degree to which the proposed developments will be compliant with NICE guidance, including relevant quality standards.

NICE has advised that it provides support and resources to help CCGs work with and use quality standards. This includes the development of formal indicators related to quality standards to measure the quality of care at CCG level, visits from the NICE field team of implementation consultants, a forward plan of topics, including likely resource implications, tools to support measurement against the standards and databases of shared learning examples about the experience of others working with quality standards and levels of uptake of these standards.


Obesity: Children – DH – Andrew Rosindell

Wed, 8 February 2017 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Andrew Rosindell (Romford) To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to educate parents on child obesity.

Answered by: Nicola Blackwood Answered on: 08 February 2017

Tackling childhood obesity is a priority for this government as set out in the Childhood Obesity Action Plan (2016), and providing information to parents is an important part of our strategy.

Change4Life is Public Health England’s (PHE) flagship campaign to help families and children in England to eat well, and move more. In January 2017 Change4Life launched the Be Food Smart campaign, which provides practical information to parents on the sugar, salt and saturated fat content of everyday food and drink.

PHE is also responsible for the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP). PHE provides guidance to local authorities on how to meet their statutory requirement to weigh and measure every child attending state school in reception and Year 6. PHE recommends that parents are provided with information about the programme and a feedback letter reporting the results. The template materials provided for local tailoring include information about maintaining a healthy weight and links to NCMP pages on the Change4Life website.

The Change4Life website can be viewed here:

https://www.nhs.uk/change4life-beta/be-food-smart


Soft Drinks: Taxation – HM Treasury – Mr Laurence Robertson

Fri, 3 February 2017 | House of Commons – Written Answer

Asked by Mr Laurence Robertson (Tewkesbury) To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what criteria he is using to determine which soft drinks will be subject to the soft drinks industry levy announced in the Budget 2016.

Asked by Mr Laurence Robertson (Tewkesbury) To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the potential revenue to the Exchequer from the proposed soft drinks industry levy.

Asked by Mr Laurence Robertson (Tewkesbury) To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the possible negative effect on businesses of the proposed soft drinks industry levy.

Answered by: Jane Ellison Answered on: 03 February 2017

As announced at Budget 2016, the levy will apply to added sugar soft drinks with total sugars above 5 grams per 100 millilitres.

The Government consulted on the detail of the soft drinks industry levy last year. In December 2016, we published our formal response to the consultation, alongside draft Finance Bill legislation, setting out further detail on the scope of the levy and those drinks included.

As for every Finance Bill measure, HM Revenue and Customs published a Tax Impact Information Note which included an updated impact assessment.

The Office for Budget Responsibility has estimated that the levy will raise £520m in the first year, £500 million in the second year, falling to £455m in the third year as more producers reformulate. These estimates are sensitive to the speed of reformulation.

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